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practically useless. s, not quite leak the grand opening brazil was hoping for. the pakistan political campaigning is under way. the violent campaign, it would appear, is also increasing. in fact, the pakistani taliban is predicting even more bloodshed. two people killed in a party rally. islamabadreport from on the violent acts to disrupt it. was planted outside the campaign office in a northwest city. the target, an independent candidate running for election before the polls. people were killed, many others wounded in the attack. shortly afterwards, another bombing, also targeting an independent candidate, killing several and injuring many more. the taliban has claimed responsibility for both attacks. there were looking at three political parties, the national and thenother movement, ruling pakistan people's party. all three are perceived as secular and liberal. seems to be the the taliban are talking, to bring in any pakistan which is conservative, more religious. completely wiped out secularism. betweene distance liberals left of democracy in pakistan. >> the son of a violence foll
of the pakistan a parliament to make sexual harassment at trial -- a crime. with this human rights and democracy center on active as of and is currently based in washington d.c. and her earlier books published by oxford and forgotten faces have been translated into three languages and popular at a young pakistan women. and continues third education teaching and university of minnesota please welcome us to on negative join us to welcome our guests. [applause] >> it is nice to be here. islet foreword to the next hour of engagement with you. if you want to turn this off you can. i am going to tell you a story today. in the context of pakistan and one woman and also the celebration of women in pakistan said it resonates across borders this is about legislation we got in pakistan against sexual harassment these laws were passed in 2010 and i will tell you why it was so important. one reason was after years of militancy women were being pushed back in the last decade and a half and this was the first come back and they regained their public space and their workspace so that was widely celebrated throu
we ought to maintain a close relationship with pakistan and help them develop the resources to be able to provide security. >> your fear is we would cut them off the relationship would not exist? >> i don't believe that they can deal with that particular threat without external support. >> thank you. >> we agreed it would be difficult to overstate the importance of those elections. in your assessment, what needs to happen between now and april of 2014 to make sure the elections are not only free and fair but recognize to be free and fair by the afghan public? >> the first precondition for successful elections is the security. earlier, summer of 2013 is very important. we need to emerge from this summer with security in those areas that are important to the elections. we need to emerge from this summer with a perception of securities of people want to participate in the elections. one of the things that will determine if they are viewed as free elections is that they are inclusive. we need to make sure people have access to the polling stations in april. from security, that i
and what must give a different situations in your home country. >> pakistan is a central piece of the study. why? because waziristan that is in the tribal areas is one of the most targeted places on earth for the program. it's also one of the trials on the earth and its traditionally never been completely subdued and did it maintains their own independence with great pride in the culture and in their own traditions. now i'm not talking about the bad guys. they get under the skin and walk about. one day he is being blown up by helicopters and the next day by these crazy suicide bombers, the fourth day by jerome strikes and in complete desperation he sends his family to waziristan so they are living in cities as destitute refugees and they say every day is like 9/11. go back to the man in the village and its impact on women and children. whatever the debate about the drones. remember there is a model in the humanity and that which is missing in the debate the impact on women and children as devastating and this has been documented in studies like the recent study by stanford and new york univ
and cover a tax revenue shortfall. pakistan's former president will not be allowed to run for the national assembly in upcoming elections. he had been cleared to campaign for northern pakistan but now being disqualified. he has been barred from running four l fou -- in all constituencies he applied for. a new session of parliament in kenya. the arrival one in a closely- contested vote last month. we're joined from our reporter in niobe -- nairobi. >> we are just outside the parliament now. we are expecting the president to arrive very soon. he will inspect the guards and enter the parliament behind me, and he will give his speech to what is the 11th parliament here in kenya. now, in his inauguration speech he really tried to ignite the country behind him. formillion people voted him. there have been meetings between the men at the state house here to try to reconcile these different camps really, political camps, in the country and try to deal with the problems the country is facing, not only economics but in terms of food security, health issues, education. we are expecting also for him t
>> pakistan's former president is now a wanted man after a court orders his arrest. >> this is al-jazeera live from doha. also ahead -- he's taking refuge at his farmhouse on the outskirts of the capital. e'll be live in islamabad. a massive explosion at a factory in texas has as many as 5 dead, more than 150 injured. u.s. investigators identify an image of a potential suspect in the boston marathon bombing. and new zealand has legalized same-sex marriage, but its neighbor to the north may have different idea. >> between five and 15 people have been killed, as well as injured more than 150 and five fighters are missing. the blast has set off tax i am fumes fanned by high winds and leveled homes and businesses nearby. tom ackerman has the latest. >> local firefighters were summoned to the plant to put out a blaze, then came the explosion. the blast in the small farming community of west near the city of waco leveled an apartment complex and damaged a nursing home located next to the plant. the explosion was felt more than 100 kilometers away, and the u.s. geological survey register
at facebook.com/booktv. >> fouzia saeed talk about women's rights issues in pakistan. at the same time being sexually harassed by the development program bosses. this is just under an hour. >> and to introduce our speaker, to discuss to discuss a pakistani woman's story of sexual harassment in the united nations--from personal grievance to public law". the book describes what happened when 11 women joined the campaign to go into the un only to be attacked by there un managers. the case culminated in legislation by the pakistani parliament in 2000 that make sexual harassment crime. she is the chair person, and human rights and democracy streaming and research on news activism and environment. and based in washington d.c. at the national endowment for democracy. and over red light areas, released by oxford and forgotten cases. and in japanese have become popular among young pakistani women. and the doctorate working at the university of minnesota. please join in welcoming today's guest dr. fouzia saeed. [applause] >> very nice to be here and i look forward to the next hour of engagement with y
the authorities to operate in pakistan the military can't go there. and the c.i.a. has what they call covert action authority. so they did it under c.i.a. control. >> reporter: covert action authority from the congress? >> well, it comes from the president. and congress signs off on it. it's how the c.i.a. operates around the world. they carry out covert actions which are technically deniable. the president auorizes them under what they call a finding. and you're basically authorized to go break the law in other countries and you have the presidential authority to do it. if it goes badly, the u.s. can deny knowledge of it. now in this case, if the bin laden operation had gone badly it would have been pretty hard for the united states to deny any knowledge of what happened. >> charlie: the president seems to like this. >> the president seems to have embraced this kind of warfare. it certainly started under the bush administration in a big way after 9/11 but president obama has, as he's drawn down... as he's ended the war in iraq and drawn down in afghanistan we have seen these ramping up of w
grounded since january. >>> former pakistani president pervez musharraf is in detention in pakistan. he gave himself up to authorities on friday, a day after the courts called for his arrest. patchari raksawong in bangkok has the story. >> pakistani authorities have arrested former president musharraf. he returned to pakistan last month from more than four years of self-imposed exile, aiming to make a political come back. the high court in islamabad ordered his arrest on thursday. the charges he faces include the illegal dismissal of judges while in office. nhk world's nazar ul islam reports from islamabad. >> reporter: musharraf, a man who once dictated power, was arrested after turning himself into the high court on friday. he seized power in a 1999 coup when he was the country's army chief. following his arrest, he hit back on his facebook page, calling the charges politically motivated, saying he will fight the allegations in court. he resigned as president after losing support at the ballot box five years ago. after fleeing abroad, he lived in self-imposed exile until he decided to
. >>> still ahead, setting the record straight about u.s. drone strikes in pakistan. they're admitting he allowed some controversial strikes. >>> up next, united nations secretary general ban ki-moon delivers direct appeal to the north korean leader, kim jong-un. >>> now a cnn exclusive. the u.s. secretary general making a direct appeal to north korea's kim jong-un in his native language. it happened during my interview in "the situation room" with ban ki-moon. listen to this. >> they're watching you in pyongyang right now on cnn international. if you have a chance to speak directly right now to kim jong-un, you can make a statement, make a request from him, what would you say to him? >> i would strongly ask him to first of all refrain from taking any such provocative measures, which is clearly in violation against the security council resolution and against the community. i would strongly urge him to enhance the living standard of his own people when they're suffering from economic difficulty. >> one final question, secretary general. look at that camera, right over there. speak to kim j
thing is there was growing instability in pakistan which made rely on pakistan's government much more difficult. the second as we know hamid karzai in afghanistan has also been becoming more and more difficult for the united states to deal with. i think drones began to look like a very attractive way of dealing with a terrorism problem in afghanistan and in pakistan, in part because dealing with the government's was so difficult and costly to do. in a relatively short period of time we've moved from a relatively spare use of drones under the bush administration on something like 50 drone strikes were launched. >> more than 300. >> in the obama administration. in part i think due to the difficulties in the situation. and the notion it's a he is dukdive form of technology it appears to have no risk for u.s. personnel and you can do without boots on the ground. if you think about an american population increasingly war warry, about a government facing financial constraints, drones look like a low cost, low risk option to be able to deal with those problems without having to go through go
that interviewed men, primarily in pakistan, talking very honestly about their intention to continue to control the women in their lives and their reach. but the business is also a unfinished here at home in the united states. we have come so far together, but there is still work to be done. now i have always believed that women are not victims, we are agents of change. we are drivers of progress. we are makers of peace. [applause] all we need is a fighting chance. and that firm faith in the untapped potential of women at home and whole world has been at the heart of my work my entire life, from college and law school, from arkansas to the white house to the senate. when i became secretary of state, i was determined to weave this perspective even deeper into the fabric of american foreign policy. but i need to do that i could not just preach to the usual choir. that we had to reach out, not only to men in solidarity and recruitment, but to religious communities, to every partner we could find. we had to make the case to the whole world that creating opportunities for women and girls advances se
a series of attacks targeting political parties in pakistan. candidates are campaigning ahead of general elections scheduled for may. citizens are are growing concerned due to slow progress and improving security conditions in the country. we have a report from islamabad. >> reporter: the elections are held on tuesday evening. a man brought explosives and detonated them at the event in the northwestern city of peshawar. >> translator: we were nearby when the blast hit. we rushed over to find body parts lying on the ground and the driver trapped in a burning vehicle. many people were injured. political officials helped us attend to the dead and injured. >> reporter: the blast killed at least 17 people including three children and a reporter who was covering the event. 78 people were injured. among the wounded was ahmed below, pakistan's former minister and a senior member of the anp. the anp strongly opposes islamic fundamentalists groups. the pakistani tal da taliban, t nation's biggest radical group, has claimed responsibility for the blast. in a separate incident, a green nad was. a gr
of attacks across pakistan targeting political groups just two weeks ahead of the general election. from theery operation bangladesh building collapse enters a fifth day. at least 360 have been killed. iceland's general election for the political priority -- party who presided over the country's economic woes. hello. shots have been fired outside of the offices of italy's prime minister. at least two prime asked police officers were injured. the prime minister, enrica l, was not -- and regal that have -- enrico letta, was not present at the time. what happened here? >> as far as police are concerned, this is a mode of lists -- motiveless attack. there is no known motive. two police officers were shot. they are not believed to be seriously injured although they are in hospital. a pregnant woman was also injured in the attack. i've just come back from the scene of the shooting, just outside the prime minister's office. you could look at the faces behind the crime scene tape. absolutely stunned. hundreds of people standing there silently as the police presence fans out across the city. at t
that the pressure cooker is a signature device that goes back to pakistan/afghanistanhandled these devices theft that there w trainer. >> the real test omwf it, whether he was radicalized or not is russia. we have to do a lot of investigation in russia because when he over to russiaback things brother. >> so is this just a sneaking /í suspicion, or is there actual evidence to t we'll talk to one the men concerns former attorney bair the biggest plot that investigators have to look at on how this all came together? >> my opinion is it's the certain signature i'reports, "wall street journal," abc news cnn and on that there -- the police areking at this as a sophisticated device wnot precisely internet plans that76 magazine. if that's the case, there's a master bomber out there. if there is a master bomber is he in bag dag aastan or ishe's in the united states there's chance he could strike again. i'm waiting an fbi age thing was. >> soviewed a cabdriver. he picked up the tsarnaev brothers he department homeland security officials have interviewed him and are reportedly tak
, senator. >> i they don't have a safe haven anymore in pakistan? >> they have a same haven inside of afghanistan in some areas, we're disrupting them but they have a sanctuary in pakistan. >> have you seen any progress there, the safe haven in pakistan? >> the progressive seen inside of afghanistan first -- >> my question is pakistan. >> they have not been able to conduct effective operations nor plan operations from pakistan. >> they don't have a safe haven in pakistan? >> they are still physically there. they are not able to plan and conduct operations from there at this point. >> well, that's very interesting news. today in the press clip, it says reduction of opium by afghans is up again. production is up. according to the united nations counter narcotics official, afghanistan is already the world's largest producer of opium and last year accounted for 74% of the world's opium supply is that of concern to you? >> it is of concern. it's a destabilizing effect. it breeds a criminal element and supports the taliban. >> i thought one of our objectives back in 2001 was to eliminate
at the brookings center for northeast asian studies. >>> pakistans former president is planning his next move. he is facing charges including the legal dismissile al of judg while in office. >>> he was arrested after turning himself into the high court on friday. he got power in 1992 when he was the countries army chief. he called the charges politically moderated saying he will fight the allegations in court. he resigned as president after losing support at the ballot box five years ago. after fleeing abroad, he lived in self-imposed exile until he decided to return to pakistan last month, ahead of the upcoming general election. >> where has the pakistan i left five years ago gone? i ask, where is that pakistan? where is that pakistan? my heart cries tears of blood when i see the state of the country today. >> musharraf launched a new party to find the pakistani general election due on may 11th. but recent polls show the largest opposition party headed by former prime minister nawaz sharif and the party of legend turned politician are making their running. musharraf's party has more high profile
go wrong? also, the first drone strike that was conducted in pakistan to kill somebody was announced as their own military operation. it wasn't. it was the cia who did it with a drone. it was apparent the two governments lied about killing that guy in pakistan in 2004. it was clear pakistan hadn't done it, that we had done it, but what was not known until now is that first-ever guy we killed in pakistan with a drone strike was not somebody we were really after. and it wasn't like he was killed by mistake. he was not a senior al-qaeda figure. he was not somebody that the united states had grand designs on and wanted to kill. he was somebody who pakistan wanted dead. pakistan was mad at him for their own reasons. we thought pakistan would let us fly our drones over the country. and the drone in pakistan in 2004, mark reports that he was essentially killed as a favor so that we could kill more people there. like with a drug dealer, first one's free. the first time the u.s. government used a drone to kill somebody outside of a war zone, we did it in yemen in 2002, a cia predator drone ki
challenge to afghanistan's security is not the taliban, but the pakistan- based sanctuaries for militant extremists, launching cross border attacks into afghanistan. it supports aaid stable and secure afghanistan. but its actions belie its words. the u.s.-pakistan relationship will not be normalized so long as those extremists safe havens exist on pakistani territory. another large challenge to a stable afghanistan is the continuing shortcomings of the afghan government in meeting the needs of the afghan people and its lack of a willingness to fight corruption by government officials. general, you have already demonstrated that you are carrying on the tradition of a highly distinguished group of u.s. commanders in afghanistan. you are right in that tradition. you are carrying it forward. we look forward to your helping us understand how far the afghans and the coalition have come and what remains to be done. >> thank you. ushink i and all the rest of up here identify with your comments about the tragedy yesterday. it is very hard to believe that happened. also, i thank you for commenting
with meryl streep and angelina jolie, and those amazing women from pakistan. today we will bring you some extraordinary women telling extraordinary stories. of course, the most extraordinary of all is standing right next to me. [applause] before she lets you hear her amazing words today, i want you to conjure up an image. this image of a solitary woman in a house in rangoon. throughout her long years under house arrest in burma, separated from her husband and her two young boys, the heroic dissidents aung san suu kyi was sustained by poster she put up on her wall. was a poster from the 1995 united nations first world conference on women in beijing. it was signed by the woman whose words at that conference served to motivate millions of others. you know those words first uttered by hillary clinton wearing that pink first lady suit at the podium in beijing. she said it there is one message that echoes from the conference, let it be that human rights are women's rights, and women's rights are human rights, once and for all. [cheers and applause] when hillary clinton spoke those words, killed
in failed states? failed governments? we would not want terrorists to congregate and pakistan or malaysia or germany. we would want somalia, yemen, afghanistan. should we be changing our approach? >> no. [laughter] no, you want terrorists to congregate in areas where the affected governments can suppress their activity. you don't want them to be left free to organize. and he dealt with them to use the state, diplomatic pouches, the banking system freely. the reason is better to have al qaeda in pakistan and afghanistan is because in pakistan, they're not allied with the pakistani government. the pakistani government, while the supporting the taliban, it is not supporting al qaeda. it is prepared to give us targets that we can strike with drones, it is willing to pick out the al qaeda people. so what you dealt what ought, the problem with afghanistan, before al qaeda had aircraft three aircraft from the that states, they had hijacked the whole country and government, called afghanistan, and that is not what you want to replicate. >> anyone else? >> building on that, i totally agree. but th
dead from the powerful earthquake in the border region between iran and pakistan. as the number of buyers for carbon certificates plunges, parlor terrines assay there'll be no efforts efforts to prop up the price. -- parliamentarians say there will be no efforts to prop up the price. >> there are no leads being reported so far in the hunt for those responsible for the bombings in boston that left three people dead and the some 170 injured. president barack obama said the bombings were an act of terrorism, organization, a domestic group, or an individual. >> police have been stepping up security monitoring everything from government buildings to sporting events. security is especially tight race now in boston. >> one day after the twin explosions, a large area in central boston is quarantines off as investigators search for evidence. many runners from the boston marathon are coming to the scene. >> i had just run across and my wife was here, cheering me on. it could have been us. it is pretty shocking. >> the first bomb detonated just meters from the finish line. seconds later, a
other than a tragic industrial accident. >> there was a dramatic courthouse escape in pakistan today after former president bush are heard he was charged with treason. he bolted from the court room surrounded by his personal bodyguards. >> he then sped away in a black suv, that after pushing back -- pushing past other security guards. he is thought to be taking residence in his farm. the court ordered his detention. for more on this story, let's talk to the head of the center for research and security studies in islamabad. first off, musharraf manages to escape from a heavily guarded courtroom without being arrested. what is going on? >> this has been quite a dramatic day in islamabad's history. musharraf basically took advantage of the confusion. within seconds, his security escort him out of the court room and took him to his farmhouse, where he has been blocked, surrounded by heavy deployment of police. we really do not know what happens tomorrow because he had planned to petition the supreme court. the chief commissioner reportedly asked the military to provide access. >> it is a
for survivors after earthquake in southwestern china that killed 100 people. no relief for pakistan's former president, pervez musharraf. ♪ ♪ relief filing for the people of boston. police have captured the second suspect in the boston marathon bombings. he is 19-years old and the other suspect, age 26 is dead. the brothers were ethnically chechen and they spend some of their childhood there. dramatic new pictures from boston as police of a surrounded and exchanged fire with the suspect. [gunshots] >> just over an hour after police lifted the stay at home order, the sound of gunfire was heard once again in watertown. >> are two more banks read their. >> it came an hour after a tipoff from a local resident. >> and men came out of his house after being inside all day, abiding by our request to stay inside. he walked outside and saw blood on a boat in the backyard. he opened the tarp on top of the boat and looked in and saw the men covered in blood. >> a helicopter confirmed dead man was hiding their and heavily armed forces surrounded the house. the standoff began. he may have been armed o
of life in bangladesh's garment industry. a factory killed 112 people. >>> officials in pakistan are looking into whether diplomats illegally sold liquor. officials say the staff were selling alcohol to the public. a spokes person for the foreign men industry says staff are looking into the complaints. officials at the north korean embassy say their diplomats are innocent. here's the three day weather forecast. >>> one more story before we go. the man who led the british to victory in world war ii will soon be making his presence felt once more. new bank notes will bear a portrait of sir winston churchill. they'll go into circulation in 2016. he led the british in their fight against nazi germany. he was also a writer. the new bank note shows the nobel literature prize medal he won in 1953. bank of england governor said churchill is a fine choice, because he was a great leader, orator and writer. >>> that concludes this edition of ne"newsline." thank you for joining us.
in pakistan are run primarily by the cia, well, in yemen, somalia, the military, the joint special operation command, plays a larger role. >> which countries have been the primary target of drone strikes. how many are recorded in the country? >> the american drones are being used in conventional theater of war such as afghanistan and iraq and also in pakistan, yemen, somalia, libya, and some reports of them being used in the philippines as well. there is diversity of opinion on the exact numbers involved. i can five you some -- give you some ranges. strikes in pakistan probably are somewhere between 365 at this point and 420 strikes. there are at least 43 to 53 strikes in yemen, and probably more. at least three to nine in smol yap. the number in libya are fudsier. there'sed at least one strike confirmed by the pentagon and some reports suggest there were quite a few during the civil war with the georgia forces. at any rate the majority have been in pakistan. >> finally, what do we know about the cost of drone strike per strike or separate budget we have public knowledge of that the cia mili
the use becks, damagics, pashtuns for dominance in the society. the pakistan would have supported the taliban as it's doing anyway, but it would have supported them in a decisive way without the counterbalancing of american power. the taliban would have become the dominant force in the country, although probably not controlling all of it. taliban remains today allied with al-qaeda, with close links with al-qaeda, and so al-qaeda would again have been able to reestablish itself. the united states would not be flying drone strikes, it would not be taking out terrorists because it wouldn't have any place to base those assets. so i think it's pretty easy to say what would have happened in afghanistan if we'd simply conducted our punitive attack on taliban, routed them and then left the country. >> gian? raj? are those the missions we should be fighting? should we be stopping sectarian violence? >> yeah. one should not take from my talk an isolationist view, right? i mean, maybe we should be involved in those kinds of things. but what we should ask ourselves at the beginning is what wi
facing afghanistan we have spent billions of dollars in pakistan since 2001. for security and for economic assistance. pakistan, at times, seem to be more of an obstacle than a partner in the progress of the region. from closing the borders to nato isilies that ties with the to lack oft groups, cooperation in the hunt for osama bin laden, what is your personal assessment of the re lationship of the united states and pakistan? >> the nexus between extremism and nuclear-weapons would be catastrophic. i personally have watched how we have dealt with pakistan over the years. in the 1990's we decided to isolate pakistan as a result of an amendment and we stopped conducting military to military engagement. i now see the adverse effect of that policy that took place over a decade ago. much renovation of leaders to not have personal relationships with our pakistani counterparts to work through some of these issues. it is in our interest to have a strategic partnership with afghanistan. we need to manage the relationship with the end in sight, which is professional and strategic. w
accident. the taliban and pakistan attacked the offices of secular parties ahead of the general election. a media crackdown, iraq suspends 10 satellite television channels. two policemen are shot outside the italian prime minister's office as the country's new government was sworn in. a school in the united states holds its first into racial prom nearly 60 years after the end of segregation. -- interracial prom nearly 60 years after the end of segregation. welcome to the program. the search for survivors after a building collapse in bangladesh has all but ended. heavy machinery has been brought in to begin the cleanup after an eight story illegal construction came down on wednesday. it is the deadliest disaster to hit the garment industry in the country. our correspondent was at the scene. >> hope of finding more survivors faded on sunday. officials leading the operation started using heavy machinery to remove piles of large concrete. it is no doubt disheartening for this man.e he is one of hundreds of volunteers searching for the debris for a sign of life. the building collapsed last le
a bond of solidarity. when need to talk about our struggles. countries like pakistan, one case of a gang rape or something happens and then it goes into the media and then they put on a flag in a goes round and round. not understanding the dynamics and not really knowing anything about the struggles. i know that there was and incident in the case a while ago, but for the past four years rehab been really having a struggle, and the movement that actually culminated in passage of legislation. the other one is on the way. but some of the media does not really talk about our struggles and our improvements and changes that the struggles culminated. i thought that this book, especially in the united states will also mean that i am, at least on my behalf, i am making an attempt, reaching out, and sharing our struggles, not our problems only, but our struggles so i hope that you will stand in solidarity with me and share our struggles and talk to others about it because it is not just that we have mild cases, but all these struggles are decades old and are fighting against centuries-old patriarc
after 2014. the greatest challenge to afghanistan's security is not the taliban, but the pakistan- based sanctuaries for militant extremists, launching cross border attacks into afghanistan. pakistan has said it supports a stable and secure afghanistan. but its actions belie its words. the u.s.-pakistan relationship will not be normalized so long as those extremists safe havens exist on pakistani territory. another large challenge to a stable afghanistan is the continuing shortcomings of the afghan government in meeting needs of the afghan people and its lack of a willingness to fight corruption by government officials. general, you have already demonstrated that you are carrying on the tradition of a highly distinguished group of u.s. commanders in afghanistan. you are right in that tradition. you are carrying it forward. we look forward to your helping us understand how far the afghans and the coalition have come and what remains to be done. >> thank you. i think i and all the rest of us up here identify with your comments about the tragedy yesterday. it is very hard to believe that ha
director. [video clip] >> i'm very pleased to be joined by my wife and -- in yemen, pakistan, somalia -- >> klees removed that woman -- please remove that woman. if you could please expedite the removal. >> pakistan and yemen -- do your job. world peace depends on it. >> please proceed. i'm going to ask that the room be cleared and that the codepink not be permitted to come back in. this five times in five times are enough. you had your hand with the sign. >> yes. i would like to explain the two women there. they had just returned. we had a group of 34 people who had gone to pakistan. we went to the tribal areas with are killing so many people. one woman came from san francisco to washington, d.c. right after being in pakistan. she wanted to have the chance to say that brennan is the mastermind of this program that is so inhumane. it is killing many innocent people and causing the u.s. to be seen as the enemy for millions of pakistanis. the second woman who got up and spoke was from indianapolis. she had also just got back. she was holding a list of names of children who had been kill
regarding assistance to pakistan and questions as to how willing and able to partner they are and what countries keep you up at night seems to be one of several national security thinkers are thinking about. have you actually spent time rethinking the idea conditionality when it comes to the carrots and sticks and military assistance? >> as we know, i relationship with pakistan wickersham challenges the past couple of years. we had the osama bin laden rate, the border incident were pakistani soldiers were killed. and so, we went through a period, a difficult. where there is not a lot of assistance flowing and communication was not great. we are now icing on a track where the communication has started to occur again and we're making progress. but we have to be realistic in our assumption and expectations. we can ask fact the pakistanis to act when it is in their interest. and now, they have had a number of incidents and attacks by extremists that directly impact their interest and also impact our interests. so it makes sense for us to work with them, where we have these mutual interest
rosetti, "the way of the knife," he's also with "the new york times," talking about the cia, pakistan and war. but up next, another author panel. this is live from usc. and this is a panel on state histories. three authors, julia siler, greg golden and t.d. allman writing about different states, talking about that. thanks for being with us, this is live coverage. [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] >> hello? hello? anybody there? hello? is there a volume? hello, hello. hi, i think we're at the witching hour now, i've got the high sign from the back of the room. you are at the los angeles times festival of books, the nonfiction landscapes view, an imagined panel. .. bill whole idea of landscapes real and imagined. my first was about the massacre on southern colorado. there is a sentinelle coming at last become next year and played a role in the way the war was waged and my most recent book, shameless promotion, had a biography about is on the map and how that city evolves and collapsed. fortunately for you that is the last you will hear about me during this panel. the p
to a journalist who went inside and spent a week at a training camp on the pakistan/afghanistan border. check it out. >> reporter: this is not your normal taliban video. more misses than hits. more recruits struggling to master their weapons. >> condition of home, sleeping -- >> reporter: he is a pakistani journalist. out of concern for his safety, wants his identity kept secret. he tells me the pakistani taliban gave him rare access to one of their remote training camps close to afghanistan where he saw them preparing for the nato pullout over the border. a battle he says the taliban think they've won. >> we inflicted damages on them, that's why they're withdrawing from the region. that is our success that they are going from the region. >> reporter: he says he shot this video over a year ago. and for the week he was there, he followed four young pakistani suicide attack recruits. the training as detailed as it was long and relentless. everything from gun cleaning to rehearsing murder while driving in a car. all of it, he says, apparently under american drone surveillance. >> there was fear
, a world lead, part two, of our look at a decade of drone strikes in pakistan, the relationship was a critical partner in the fight against terrorism. yesterday, we broke the news that former pakistani president pervez musharraf told cnn's senior international correspondent nic robertson that pakistan secretly signed off on u.s. drone strikes while he was in power. today, kninic looks at how the strikes are affecting civilians caught in the cross fire. >> reporter: as the debate in washington over drones remains mostly theoretical, here in pakistan, the impact of the drones is very real, killing not just terrorists, but women and children too, raising the possibility that the stealth weapons are creating a new generation of radicals. a few years ago, the taliban held sway here. we're in the valley, a few hours drive from pakistan's capital, and the army are taking us to see the next generation of jihadis. in this classroom, trained child suicide bombers and killers. boys as young as 8, all from poor families, all weaned on taliban propaganda, not about osama bin laden, but u.s.
in a rocket attack on a power station in northern pakistan. the grim -- the grid system in peshawar has been destroyed. abducted andere the bodies were found nearby. for the first time in pakistan, two women are running for parliament, filing nomination papers. raising their voice about issues in their area is risky business. badam zari, one of the only two female candidates from the area. >> i made this decision to serve and help our sisters and mothers in the area. the tribal area is poor and backwards. we have problems in the health and education sectors. this is the reason i decided to take part in the election. a brave stepacy is as women have been attacked for being vocal. in october, a 14-year-old girl was targeted at pakistani taliban when she raised her voice for the right to education. in july, a women's rights activist was shot. female, pakistan's first prime minister was killed at a rally when she was running for parliament. badam zari is in the northwest conservative area where women are discouraged from taking part in public life. >> this woman has broken barriers. this is very
." >>> militants attacked a power plant in pakistan on tuesday. unrest continues in the country in the lead-up to the scheduled general elections. pat here's the story. >> the attack left at least seven people dead and raises fears of possible electric shortages in the major city of peshawar. the incident serves as a reminder of national leaders' failure to stop militant attacks, and manage chronic power shortages. dozens of militants targeted the power station with mortars and rocket-propelled grenades. >> translator: five people have given their lives while performing their duties. the attackers have taken with them some members of the operations and maintenance staff. so far, there is no trace of them. >> no groups have claimed responsibility for the attack. the plant is one of the largest in northwestern pakistan, and is normally a key power supplier to peshawar city. >> translator: restoration will take time, as the massive damage. there's too much to repair. >> the authority that manages the plant says an entire grid station was destroyed, meaning local people's daily lives will be af
.8 earthquake has struck iran near the border with pakistan. military spokespersons in pakistan say at least 34 people were killed. and media in iran report that one woman was killed there. the earthquake struck in the middle of the afternoon. it hit hardest in a mountainous region straddling the border between iran and pakistan. communications were cut off. authorities are still trying to assess the damage. pakistani media showed an video of offices shaking at a tv station in karachi, about 600 kilometers from the epicenter. people felt the tremor as far away as new delhi. that's about 1,500 kilometers from the epicenter. the quake shook buildings, sending people running into the streets. a magnitude 6.3 tremor hit southern iran a week ago killing at least 37 people. iranians have seen even worst quakes in the past. in 2003, a magnitude 6.6 quake struck the southeastern city. more than 40,000 people died. and in 1990, a magnitude 7.7 tremor hit northwestern iran, leaving about 35,000 dead. >>> chinese officials say wild birds could be spreading the bird flu strain. among poultry. authorities h
they can to disrupt pakistan. voters are scheduled to go to the polls in general elections in may. they are growing increasingly concerned about their own security. >> reporter: the latest hit an election rally for the anp party on tuesday evening. a man brought explosives and detonated them at the event in the north western city. >> translator: we were nearby when the blast hit. we rushed over to find body parts lying on the ground and the driver trapped in a burning building. many were injured. >> reporter: the blast killed at least 17 people including three children and a reporter who was covering the event. 78 people were injured. among the wounded was pakistan's former minister and a senior member of the anp. the anp strongly opposes islamic fundamentalist groups. the pakistani taliban has claimed responsibility for the blast. in a separate incident on tuesday it will take us through a hand grenade and politician from the party. bystanders were injured. another bombing targeted a candidate representing the largest opposition party. four people were killed in the attack. attac
targeting political parties in pakistan. candidates are campaigning ahead of general election for may. citizens are becoming increasingly concern due to slow progress and security conditions in the country. reporting from islamabad. >> reporter: the latest attack his an election rally on tuesday evening. the men brought explosives and detonated them in the evening at the northwestern city of peshawar. >> translator: we were nearby when the blast hit. we rushed over to find body parts lying on the ground and a driver trapped in a burning vehicle. many people were injured. political officials helped us attend to the dead and injured. >> reporter: the blast killed at least 17 people, including three children and a reporter who was covering the event. 78 people were injured. among the wounded was ahmed below, pakistan's former railways minister and a senior member of the anp. the anp strongly opposes islamic fundamentalists groups. the pakistani taliban, the nation's biggest radical group, has claimed responsibility for the blast. in a separate incident, in peshawar on tuesday, attackers
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